Thursday April 27, 2017

Register today

REGIONAL JOURNALISM, GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE.

Politics
The Canadacast

Indigenous delegates raise food, health concerns

While much of the focus of the recent Arctic Council summit was on high politics, native groups were more concerned about down-to-earth issues like food and mental health
Politics
Saumon á la arctique (Photo: Brian Pehora)

Share this article

Facebook Google Twitter Mail

iAbout Press releases

As part of our continuing efforts to bring you as much information about our region as possible we offer readers a press release service that allows private firms, public agencies, non-governmental organisations and other groups to submit relevant press releases on our website.

All press releases in this section are published in their full length and have not been edited.

If you have a press release or other announcement you would like to have published, please send it to arcticjournal-editor@arcticjournal.com.

We reserve the right to reject press releases we deem irrelevant or inappropriate. 

All material submitted to The Arctic Journal, including pictures and videos, will be assumed to be available for publication by The Arctic Journal and its related entities.

Was there anything else besides political tension and would-be observers discussed yesterday and today in Iqaluit at the Arctic Council ministerial meeting?

Yes, particularly among indigenous groups, who expressed concern that high politics were getting in the way of down-to-earth issues.

In this edition of the Canadacast, Brian Pehora, our Nunavut correspondent, files this report from the Arctic Council meeting.

We hope you enjoy our new Canadacast audio reports. We look forward to bringing you more updates from Nunavut.

The Candacast is produced in collaboration with CFRT – Iqaluit community radio.